New PhD Studentship Opportunity!

  • Acknowledging intersectionality and improving inclusivity within shared mobility/mass transit

    Enquiries: Dr Maurizio Catulli

    Supervisors: Prof Joanna R AdlerDr Maurizio Catulli

    Originality: Personal mobility through private cars accounts for disproportionate environmental transport emissions. Shared mobility offerings are promising alternatives to private cars. These enable travellers to manage diverse modes of shared transport through smartphone apps. Examples include car and bicycle sharing, and mini e-scooters for rent, often used in conjunction with public transport. Despite their environmental benefits, shared mobility options have not been widely adopted. One challenge that affects shared mobility offerings is low inclusivity. Women, for example, have fewer opportunities to use shared mobility, as they incur risks of unwanted attention from men or enhanced feelings of vulnerability. There have been, for example, cases when women have been assaulted by drivers of shared mobility providers. Additional concerns may be considered in relation to others who do not identify with those they perceive as common users. The doctoral student will investigate strategies to make shared mobility safer and thereby more inclusive of women, moving on to consider related matters of inclusion and intersectionality in later stages of the thesis development.

    Rigour: The topic is supported by extant research which confirms its relevance, vis Gekoski et al. (2017), Weinreich et al. (2021) and Apena-Rogers (2019). It is anticipated that a mixed method, triangulated research design would be suitable, drawing in appropriate stakeholder groups. Ethics management would conform to relevant legislative (e.g., DPA, 2018) UPR and to professional body requirements.

    Potential Contribution to Knowledge: The proposed topic is policy sensitive and would build on work previously commissioned by the British Transport Police and Department of Transport. The research will address theoretical, pragmatic and policy knowledge gaps in the accessibility and inclusivity of shared mobility.

    References
    Apena-Rogers, F. (2019). Understanding the commission process of sex offending on London railways: An integrated theoretical framework. Doctoral Thesis, Middlesex University. Director of Studies: J.R. Adler.
    Gekoski, A., J. M. Gray, J. R. Adler, and M. A. H. Horvath. 2017. The prevalence and nature of sexual harassment and assault against women and girls on public transport: an international review. Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice 3:3-16.
    Weinreich, M., A. Kingstedt, V. Betina, F. Romani, F. Andersson, A. Kirjanen, O. M. Larsen, B. W. Leow, and H. Bajaj. 2021. Gender and (Smart) Mobility. Ramboll, Helsinki, Finland.

  • Find listing here: Under ‘Smart Mobility’
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